In international schools, why do the more progressive institutions continue to provide more opportunities for the small societies in the classroom to thrive as learners, rather than in the more traditional environments?

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In international schools, why do the more progressive institutions continue to provide more opportunities for the small societies in the classroom to thrive as learners, rather than in the more traditional environments?

Abstract – This study was created to take a closer look at small societies in the classroom with traditional and progressive education approaches. It investigates the increase of international schools who Expatica (2011) and (thepienews 2013, cited ISC Research 2013) who have a choice and freedom over their curriculum they decide to deliver to their learning community. Looking closer at the term ‘progressive education’. Kohn (2008) defines progressive education as attending to the whole of the child and “are concerned with
helping children become not only good learners but also good people. The small society in the class consists of a number of students who each play their own part in this mini society, together making a whole. The class therefore is a part of a bigger society, together with others as the school. Each of these small societies is created of students of different backgrounds, roles and aspirations, some of which are influenced by their parents. Parsons (1959) states that an “elementary and secondary school class as a social system” and that this social system fits in with the school as a whole and on its own as understood by the student where their education takes place

Paul Walton MSc
Nadeen International School, Bahrain
Email: [email protected]

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